Remainder Theorem INB 90 1/14/13

INB 81 – ACT Geometry Review:

#1, #2

#1, #2

#3, #4

#3, #4

 

 

 

 

 

Monday 1/14/13 In Class Notes / Examples:

Friday we “discovered” that we could substitude “a” into our polynomial and the result would be the remainder if we divided by (x-a).

Today, we’re answering the question “When we use  Remainder Theorem, what is this really telling us?”

INB page 90 “More Remainder Theorem”

We graphed the given polynomial as a function in our graphing calculators.  Noted the x-intercepts. "Created" factors from our x-intercepts, then graphed our factors to see the graphed resulted in the same thing.

We graphed the given polynomial as a function in our graphing calculators. Noted the x-intercepts. “Created” factors from our x-intercepts, then graphed our factors to see the graphed resulted in the same thing.

 
We used the remainder theorem to show that (x+5) was indeed a factor!

We used the remainder theorem to show that (x+5) was indeed a factor!

Again, we used the Remainder Theorem to show (x-1) was NOT a factor.  Students already noted it was not an x-intercept on the graph.

Assignment/Practice due Tuesday:  

remaindertheorempractice11413

Algebra 2 1/8/13 Long Division with Polynomials

Cool Math – Division of Polynomials examples of Monday – Wednesday skills.

1/7/13 Dividing Polynomials by Monomials (wkst 51 practice)
Video:

Polynomial divided by monomial: Polynomial divided by monomial

1/8/13 – 1/9/13 long division polynomials skills practice handout (assigned odds only)
video:

Polynomial Division: Polynomial Division

1/10/13 Synthetic Division for Polynomials (assign evens from handout above 1/8/13
video:

Synthetic Division: Basic algorithm for Synthetic Division

11/11/13 Mistake Game! and Polynomial Review Stations

Cool Math – Division of Polynomials examples

Geometry 1/9/13

INB 15 Segments & Midpoints

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INB 14 Part 1 Processing Midpoints of Segments (boss/secretary) Part 2 Segment Addition practice page 8

 

INB 17 Midpoints with Coordinates

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After some sharing of how to find the midpoints with graph paper – another student suggested he added the coordinates, then divided by 2. 

Find M, the midpoint of AB.  A(7, 3) and B (13, 5)…

x-coordinates:  7+13=20 / 2 = 10 and y-coordinates:  3 + 5 = 8 / 2 = 4 so the midopint will be M(10, 4)

INB 16 practice #11-20